How to Transfer from Yellow Pages

Let’s face it, changing providers isn’t always easy to do even when the company you’re transferring to and from are both helpful and friendly; that’s the whole reason we have a SiteMigrator service to do it for you. That change can be made much harder when the company you want to leave keeps trying to stop you, and there’s no worse offender for this we’ve seen than YellowPages.

When it comes right down to it, the steps you need to follow are the same as any other transfer. They’re just made more difficult.

  1. Regain control of your domain!
  2. New web hosting: A place for your website / email to live
  3. New web site: Or a copy of your existing YP site (if they’ll give it to you!)
  4. Email configured and ready to roll: You don’t want to miss any emails!
  5. Move your domain

This is a typical lay of the land for a transfer… let’s explore in more detail:

Domain Registration – who’s in control of your domain?

If you’ve checked your domain registration since moving to Yellow Pages, you might have noticed your email has changed to multimedia@yp.ca. That, unfortunately, puts them in control of your domain. Even worse, they’re not going to change it for you. They’ll give you a dozen excuses for why, but I’ve seen more people who can’t get their contact information changed / transfer authorization (EPP) code than people who can. 

The first step is to regain control of your domain. Of course, you should try to do this via Yellow Pages first. Call them and ask them to change the Registrant and Admin emails to your email address. If When they say no, don’t panic! We’ve gone through this before, and this is what we’ve needed to do:

  • Make sure your information on the domain matches your own.
    • Even if the email doesn’t, make sure that your name and address / phone are correct. Ideally they all match, but you can settle for name and one other corroborating piece.
    • If they don’t match, talk to Yellow Pages to get that updated. Since this doesn’t relinquish control, they likely would do this for you.
  • Take a picture of the front and the back of your driver’s license.
  • If this is a business domain, scan / take pictures of your Articles of Incorporation or other business registration documents as applicable.
  • Call Enom at (425) 274-4500. Explain to them that you’re a customer of their reseller, Yellow Pages, and that YP has refused to change your email address on file or provide an EPP (transfer) code.

Enom will generally ask for the documents I’ve referenced to validate that you are in fact the owner of the domain. This has typically taken 1-4 days for them to do; remember that the steps they’re taking to do this are for your protection as a domain owner (it is frustrating, I know, but bear with them!).

Web Hosting – Your site needs a new home!

Whether you managed to talk Yellow Pages into giving you a copy of your website or you’re going to be starting out from scratch, you’re going to need a new home on the web. Of course, I would recommend our own Canadian web hosting platform, but whatever you choose you’ll want to have it set up and ready.

A new website for a new host?

Once you have your new hosting ready to go, you can either upload the site (if you got it from Yellow Pages), or create a new site. Even a placeholder with your contact information would be a good way to start!

If you’re looking for a fresh start, or even just a revamp of your existing site, we offer a range of web design services to meet every budget.

Make sure your email is set up!

Does Yellow Pages provide your email service? Well, unfortunately, it’s connected to your domain registration. The moment you move your domain, your email *will* go down. So, how do we fix this?

Step 1: Create email accounts on your new hosting account

Step 2: Set your new email accounts up on your devices (phone / computer)

Step 3: Migrate over your existing email (see the Email section here)

Transfer your domain!

Now that we’ve got everything set up, hopefully Enom has gotten back to you. Your email address should now be updated for the domain, and they will have hopefully provided you your EPP / Transfer authorization code.

Step 1: Ask Enom if they can change the nameservers for you. Your new web host should have provided name servers for your hosting account. If they have, give those to Enom and ask them to point your domain there.

Step 2: Once the nameservers are updated (or if Enom won’t do it), begin the transfer with the company you want to register the domain through.

Step 3: Confirm the domain transfer. You should receive an email at the address you gave Enom for the domain. This email will ask you to confirm that you’d like to transfer it. You often have to click a link or the transfer will fail. Keep an eye out for that email!

Step 4: Sit back and wait; it can take anywhere from an hour to five days for the transfer to complete. Don’t worry, you’ll get an email when it’s done.

Allen is a self professed geek and technology lover. He's always playing with one of his various websites, and loves helping customers with theirs. He can often be found with a coffee (light roast, please) in his hand and a smile on his face... or with a plate of bacon. Mmm, bacon.

2 Comments

  1. Trevor on January 22, 2018 at 2:53 pm

    Thanks for this step by step breakdown Allen, I am working to navigate a site away from YP with minimal disruption to page rank, email etc. I am in Canada but believe the process is the same with a few different players. In the meantime do you see it as possible to set up a subdomain where we can post our own content that will build authority in advance of transferring?

    • Allen Pooley on January 22, 2018 at 3:02 pm

      Hey Trevor,

      We’re in Canada, too! I could see that being an option, but honestly I would think that your time would be better spent building out the new site, preparing all the 301 redirects you’ll need for when you do get the domain, and preparing a pile of fresh content to drip-feed onto the site starting the moment it’s successfully moved over.

      Considering that you’re likely only looking at a few weeks, you can probably do a lot more in preparation than you could do in building authority prior to getting the new site online.

      I’m curious, was YP willing to set up a subdomain for you? In the situations I’ve encountered, that would have been miles ahead of what they were doing for us!

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